Thursday, November 24, 2005

Music to drive by

I have a battered old cassette deck in my car. Rather unwisely I have started to listen to my old collection of personal favourites while driving in and out of Norwich and Cromer. Today it was the turn of Prokofiev - his first Violin concerto and Cinderella music. Is there a more exquisitely delicate piece of orchestral scoring than the return of the main theme in the first movement of the concerto? If there is, I don't know it. It could melt the heart of a mass-murderer. What a wonderful, amazing, miraculous thing music is!

5 comments:

MaLj said...

When driving, I listen to music that is not always the very best and sweetest, but interesting for the moment, and possible to get the idea of in the surrounding noise. Often song of some not too soft kind. Opera, jazz, musical, rock, pop. My best choice of music for difficult driving late at night was the Goldberg variations - when I was out on dark roads in a cold car after a long day and night of sailing.

MaLj said...

Andrew, I just want to tell you that I was informed by MW that he did write a reply about the value of Prokofiev's music, but his computer was unfair to him today so the careful comment was lost. How sad.

Andrew Lowe-Watson said...

I hope very much to read Michael's comment later

MaLj said...

I returned to read this blog post today, after I have listened to Prokofiev's first violin concerto for the first time (three times the same morning!), and suddenly remembered Andrew had mentioned a "beautiful" Prokofiev work in November... I have to write more about this, somewhere else (email or blog) - later.

Surly Terrier said...

Maria, there are many "beautiful" Prokofiev works to be discovered. In spite of my aversion to lists and ranking, I'd have to say that P was definitely one of the Masters of the 20th Century, but unfortunately overlooked in many concert halls these days, at least locally. Try the piano concerti, Romeo and Juliet, the Cinderella and the violin concerto Andrew mentioned, and I also admit to a fondness for War and Peace and Alexander Nevsky.